Anti aging guide

Suitable Diet to Treat Age-Related Diseases

 

 

Correct Nutrition

Many health problems can be prevented by the correct nutrition. Osteoporosis can be helped by adequate intake of calcium, heart disease by controlling dietary fat and by reducing cholesterol, diabetes by avoiding too much sugar and by losing any excess weight.

Special benefits of anti-aging nutrition may include an improvement of the immune system which fights infections, a healthier brain, a body which looks younger than its actual age, and generally a more enjoyable life.

Aim to have six servings a day of grain-based food, such as brown rice, pasta, bread or cereal. Complement this with three servings of milk, yogurt or cheese and two servings of meat, fish or poultry.

Good nutrition after the age of 30 does not only depend on what we eat but also how we eat it. After a certain age, changes in the way our body works can make us prone to follow a less than ideal diet and this can increase the risk of certain age-related diseases.

The senses of smell and taste start to decline after the age of 35. This is partly due to changes in the sensory nerves of the nose and tongue, which are sometimes damaged by smoking or by infections. A healthy lifestyle and special sense exercises should help maintain a good sense of smell and taste.

The sensation of thirst also decreases slowly over the years. This may lead to dehydration, particularly in hot weather or during an illness. On average we need to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day.

With the passage of time we lose our ability to taste salt. This means that we may be adding too much salt to our food to make it palatable. You should be careful and judge your use of salt with your eyes, not rely too much on your taste.

Also, with aging, some people experience a dry mouth. A helpful trick in this situation is to look at the plate of food for one or two minutes before actually starting to eat. This should increase the production of saliva and make eating more pleasant.

Posted by Carol Hudgens - February 1, 2012 at 6:58 pm